Tag Archives: goats

I’ve often said that one of the biggest adjustments to farm life is the inability to have a plan for the day and actually see it through. Events on the farm have a way of just unfolding in their own unpredictable and sometimes urgent manner. As farmers, we try to effectively respond.

Today began with rain as expected, which meant it would be a good time to catch up on indoor work and errands. Personally, I had a really long (and unrealistic) list that I hoped to tackle and Bruce and Rick went to do off-farm tasks.

Sara’s mom, Katie, is visiting and around midday went to check on the does and their kids -- this is (finally) the exciting part I’ve been leading up to.

Apple and her kids

The goats had chosen today while it was pouring to ESCAPE! Katie thinks that a (mischievous) goat kid led the way through a small hole in the fence. Eight other goats (large and small) followed and were happily grazing by the tractor barn when she discovered their mischief.  (We didn't get pictures of this so we'll substitute generic cute goats).

kids climbing mom

Sara, our goat whisperer, dashed down and in no time had those errant goats back where they were supposed to be. Armed with a bucket of feed and their favorite call, “hey ladies” they would follow Sara anywhere!

Doe with kids

 

I got back to the farm before Rick and Bruce and (very proudly) fixed the fence. Snickers and Doodles supervised and protected me from all kinds of imagined beasts.

So, I’m a bit late writing this blog.  I had originally planned to write about our adorable kids rather than than our mischievous kids. But, this change might be ok because we’ve actually had a couple people tell us to turn down the “cute factor.”

Did the breakout succeed in lessening the cute factor?   I don’t know—they really are cute!

2105 buckling

Right now, their favorite game seems to be bumper cars. They zoom here and there and occasionally crash into each other. There’s a few who are climbers and will get in the feeders or stand atop the salt block and a couple who are ballet dancers and gracefully leap through the air—yep, they’re pretty cute!

kids at play

They have all been tagged, given a vitamin booster, weighed, and photographed. Now, they need names and that’s the job of Laura (age 10) and Maya (age 7). Every year we pick a theme for naming our female goats --I’ll let you figure out why we don’t name the bucklings. Of our 31 kids, 16 are doe-lings and need names.

Laura & Maya with new kids

Last year. Laura was learning about and fascinated by Greek goddesses so that was our theme. This year is a little tricky for the girls. We chose wine grapes so we’re making a list of white grapes and red grapes and then the girls can assign names. So far, they’ve named the first and last born.

Champagne, 2015 doe-ling

 

This is Champagne,  first-born white doe-ling born.

Petit Verdot, 2015 doe-ling

 

 

 

 

 

 

And, this is her petite brown sister named Petit Verdot.

 

 

 

 

This cutie is Sherry, the last doe-ling born.  I wonder if Laura and Maya will name one Port?Sherry, 2015 doe-ling

We’ll try to keep the “cute factor” under control in future posts but it's a challenge!  Stay tuned for some videos of goat kids at play.

kid at rest

Kids are never predictable—whether they’re human or goats. We were caught with our fences down on Saturday afternoon when our first pair of goat kids arrived.   Sara and I were at the Charlottesville Waldorf Holiday Bazaar when Rick, Laura, and Maya found two new arrivals in D field -- where the fence is intact.       They expertly guided all 22 goats (15 pregnant does and 7 yearlings) back to the goat barn through fields C and B, where the fence is currently being repaired.

Cocoa kid #1Our first pair are the offspring of Cocoa, a maiden doe.  We are very proud of her for successfully initiating the 2015 season. She proudly presented us with two lovely doe-lings and put us on heightened alert Cocoa kid #2for more kids—in other words, frequent trips to the barn. Last year once the first kids arrived, we had a domino effect for the next five days so we figured we should be prepared for a similar sequence.

But alas, no kids on Sunday.

Faith kid #2

 

Monday brought three new sets of adorable healthy kids.

 

 

 

 

 

Sleepy kid

And then came Tuesday.

Between 5 am and 11 pm, we had seven does give birth! Two single births, one triple birth, and 4 twins—yep, we had 13 kids yesterday. It was a bit crazy at times with multiple does in labor.  We had a couple worrisome moments--like when one of our big experienced does was in horrible pain (not normal delivery pain). Our guess is that either there was a breech presentation or some other internal obstruction or twist. Nature is amazing. She worked through the pain, getting up and down, stretching and contracting, finally came out of it and presented three healthy kids.

kid playing

We also had a maiden doe that didn’t seem to immediately have the maternal instinct. She needed help cleaning her kids and helping one of them to nurse. It's critical that the kids get mom’s colostrum as it provides antibodies and helps get the digestive, immune and respiratory systems started.  We were glad we were there to assist!

Happily all the kids are now doing great.

Goat pile

And what about today? Five new kids! One doe went out in the field and popped out three Super Momstrapping babies in less than 20 minutes. Another doe labored all morning before finally delivering two very cute kids around lunchtime. Sara and I were hoping that the last two does would also deliver today but not yet.

 

Who knows, maybe by the time I post this there will be more kids in the barn…stay tuned.

happy kid

It's Chinese New Year and guess what?    It's the year of the goat!  We suspect our goats are secretly celebrating late at night after the rest of us are tucked in (our warm beds).  Of course, all the evidence is gone in the morning.

Thanks to Cousin Ed for forwarding this article on the new Chinese Lunar Year.  Be sure to check out all the cute goat pictures, as well as what life during the year of the goat means for you.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/31535477

IMG_8826These triplets are nearing 40 lbs at 2 months!

 

A lot has happened on the farm since my last post, so here’s an update on the goats, strawberries, vines and bees.

Quizno, our buck,  was happily reunited with the does at the end of the June. Sara says that not only was Quizno elated but the ladies were pretty darn happy to see him, as well. They

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are now enjoying the ample grass and forage in their new field and, hopefully, all or some of the does are already carrying their next offspring.  The average gestation period for meat goats is 150 days, which means we should start having kids on the ground around December 1 (hopefully, we won’t have an arctic blast during kidding as we had this year!).IMG_4377

This year’s crop of does are continuing to grow (especially their ears) and entertain us with theirIMG_4392 antics. You can see Apple’s ear taking off as she and her friends race down the hill to greet Sara (hum, does Sara have treats in her pocket?). Annabeth is the adorable kid playing hide and seek inside the tree and in the next photo, her friend, ShyGirl, is trying to squeeze in with her.

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Snickers and Doodle are continuing to work as a team to round up the kids for us. This is tremendously helpful when we need to catch them for worming, hoof trimming, or any other reason. Check out this very short video on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5iR4oBrgWU&feature=youtu.be. Once they have them corralled Snickers patrols the perimeter like a herd dog should, while Doodle prefers to pass out kisses to any goats that are willing. It’s a tough life for dogs and goats at MFF!

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Our strawberry season was shorter than anticipated due to the rains in early June. We were hoping our ever-bearing plants would make a comeback and produce a July crop but sadly it didn’t happen. We still have plenty of berries in the freezer for our spreads so I’m making it as fast as I can! We sell it at the Fluvanna Farmer’s Market on Tuesdays, Farmers in the

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Park on Wednesday, and the UVA Market on Thursday. This week we introduced a sampler pack which includes three 4 oz. jars--one of each flavor and it sold out in no time. It’s a great choice if you can’t decide which flavor you like best or as a gift pack (great alternative to a bottle of wine).

In addition to all the traditional uses, we’re discovering lots of new ways to enjoy strawberry spread. Our friend, Mark, served 4th of July ribs cooked with a sauce made from our Strawberry Balsamic spread. I’m trying to get the recipe but Mark’s not a recipe kinda guy -- we’ll see. He also made a chicken marinade by combining Strawberry Vanilla and tomatillo sauce. Daughter Amy created a summer cocktail by combining Strawberry Lavender spread and vodka, then adding sparkling water, and finishing it off with a sprig of mint. Thursday a group of ladies were excited about scones and strawberry spread—a little afternoon tea? And, of course a super simple dessert is topping your favorite ice cream with Strawberry Vanilla spread. If you’ve got a recipe using any of our strawberry spreads, send it to me (with pictures, if possible) and we’ll share it!

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The vines are prospering and look beautiful! It looks like we had minimal damage from the winter this year (those burning hay bales must have helped)! Our new sprayer and spray program are doing great and the irrigation system for Block A and Block B are photo 5operational. As of Friday, all 400 posts for the new vineyard, Block C, are in the ground---good work guys! Next, comes trellis wires and then irrigation to complete Block C.

The beehives are filling up with honey. Both hives now have two supers and the bees are starting to draw out the wax in the upper super. Its really amazing watching them work and seeing the growth of the honeycomb and development of the eggs. Cover crops and crop rotation are an important part of sustainable farming so Rick planted one of the empty berry fields with cover crops, buckwheat and clover, and the bees love it!

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Remember to send us your Strawberry Spread recipes and photos!

For all its promise and beauty, spring in Virginia is quite fickle…

Every part of the farm is alive and showing growth.  The does are enjoying their lush new pasture and the kids are just plain cute! P1050806 P1050830

Isn't she adorable?

The bulbs and flowering trees are creating new displays of color everyday. 

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The bees are making honey and the frogs are reproducing (by the millions!)

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Strawberry field #1 is packed with blossoms and field #2 has about 10,000 daughter plants!

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About the fickle part… 

The new vines are in the ground and we were starting to see bud break when a nasty cold front blew in freezing temperatures--not good for vines (strawberries are much hardier). We decided that our best preventative would be to strategically place round hay bales around the vineyard and create a smoke layer to insulate the ground (helicopters and wind machines are more effective but just a bit more costly).

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In the afternoon of Day 1, Bruce and Rick checked the wind direction and put 8 round bales in the vineyard (with the help of Snickers and Doodle), ready for lighting sometime around midnight. Unfortunately, in the process of igniting bales the truck got stuck in the mud, so it wasn't until about 2 am that they called it a night.

That just about finished off the farm's supply of old round bales so the next day we called friends and neighbors and located a large stash of really old musty bales, ours for the taking and burning—thank you, Channing!

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Again, we checked the wind and placed the bales. When we were almost done, we looked across the vineyard and noticed that we’d dropped a bale on a smoldering pile from the night before—oops! That one went up in smoke.

When Spring came to her senses and returned to central VA, we checked the vines and it looks like our big burns did some good, despite the 26F temperature-- only limited damage to the vines.

So, enough of the fickleness!  Like all farmers we want spring to bring rain (just enough), plenty of sun, and warm temperatures!

As I write this, our "just enough" rain has turned into 2" with another 2" possible--we might be needing rain boots for our goats!

The peepers are chirping, the daffodils are up, and the trees are showing their colors--spring has come to central VA!  But, along with spring comes spring work, and this year it’s compounded by tasks we weren’t able to get done during out snowy, wet, and ridiculously cold winter.   So, this past week we were busy in the vineyard, berry patch, and barnyard.

To begin, we had 4,330 new bare root vines arrive—our new varieties, Viognier, Chardonnay, and Cab Franc, as well as replacement vines for plants we lost during 2013.   Normally, we would have already set the poles for the new vines but this year, we were lucky to just get the IMG_5737new two-acre section ready to plant.   This is a multistep process…ripping then rototilling the soil and then digging a trench for irrigation pipe and laying the pipe.  Once this was accomplished the rows were staked and marked with string for straightness and the location of each plant was marked (yes, that’s a lot of marks!). Finally, holes were dug and our new vines were planted in their homes.

Once that was done, each new vine got a bamboo stick and a grow tube to protect it from the ever present and ever hungry deer, as well as other hazards.  The grow tube also acts as a miniature green house and keeps the young plant warm.  Next week we’ll get started on the posts and the trellis wires and in about 2 weeks we hope to have bud break!

And, the strawberries should be budding soon, too. Last fall we covered all our berries with hay to protect them froIMG_5588m the winter weather so we’ve been uncovering them and cutting them back to prepare for their new growth.   Rick’s also preparing berry field #2 for the daughter plants.  We’re expecting A LOT of strawberries starting mid to end of May and continuing through July. Beginning in June, our berries will be available at the Fluvanna’s Farmer Market (www.facebook.com/pages/Fluvanna-Farmers-Market-Pleasant-Grove/368116841344) on Tuesdays, Farmers IMG_5638in the Park (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Farmers-in-the-Park/81048539935)  on Wednesdays, some Saturdays at the City Market (http://www.charlottesvillecitymarket.com/), Salt Artisan Market (http://saltcville.com/), local restaurants, as well as on the farm during TBA Pick Your Own days.

S0070194Goats unlike plants have a lot of opinions. Much to the dismay of the moms and kids we weaned the baby goats. There’s really no way to do this without a lot of unhappy, noisy goats.  Our plan was to move the does to a different field and confine the kids inside the barn, aka Goat Palace, for a couple of days.   We were hoping to separate them by more than a fence for a couple days.  No one was happy, but it appeared all was well until 11 pm, when I looked out the window and saw kids in the field.  Bruce and I promptly changed from our PJs to barn clothes and went out.  It was like the first day of school for new moms and toddlers…all the does were on their hind legs and emotionally calling, “Buttercup, Peanut, Apple…” while all the kids were on their side of the fence crying, “Mom, don't leave me!”DSCF0184

 

We started to catch the kids one by one and put them back in the Goat Palace until there were about 6 nimble kids left.  After running in circles and tripping over ourselves (it was dark!) and goats, we realized that once we returned them to the Goat Palace there was nothing to prevent them from escaping through our clearly ineffective “kid proof ” fencing again.  We gave up, opened the gate and got back in our PJs.

Thinking we were really done for the night, Bruce went to brush his teeth and discovered we didn’t have any water—some nights just go on forever!  The problem wasn’t in the cottage so back into our photobarn clothes to find the problem.  It seems that Jackson, our adorable but precocious mini-mule, had opened a hydrant in the field and drained our well.  Fortunately, after we locked the hydrant, our well refilled relatively quickly!

On Saturday, we said good-bye to all of our boy kids and two of the girls.  The doe kids staying on the farm were again noisy as their siblings and friends departed but seemed to quickly forget when thIMG_5768ey realized that the dinner table was much less crowded.

All in all, it was a productive week with just enough comic relief.

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